First Year Courses

These courses do not count for credit toward a LACS major or minor but are strongly recommended to students with Latin American or Caribbean interests. Please consult Divisional First Year Calendars and the Founders College Calendar for further details.

AP/HUMA 1300 9.00 Cultures of Resistance in the Americas: The African American

This course addresses the ways in which diasporic Africans have responded to and resisted their enslaved and subordinated status in the Americas. Resistance is first addressed in relationship to slavery, but later in the course resistance is seen in a much broader context: in response to post-colonial and post-civil rights, and as an engagement of national, economic, cultural and social forces. Thus, resistance might be understood as a continuing legacy of black peoples' existence in the Americas. Resistance is, first, read in relationship to European domination in the Americas and, second, to national and other post-emancipation forms of domination which force us to think of resistance in increasingly more complex ways. The "anatomy of prejudices"—sexism, homophobia, class oppression, racism—come under scrutiny as the course attempts to articulate the libratory project.

The course focuses, then, on the cultural experiences of African diasporic peoples, examining the issues raised through a close study of black cultures in the Caribbean, the United States and Canada. It critically engages the ways in which cultural practices and traditions have survived and been transformed in the context of black subordination. It addresses the aesthetic, religious and ethical practices that enable black people to survive and build "communities of resistance" and allow them both to carve out a space in the Americas they can call home and to contribute variously to the cultures of the region.

AP/SOSC 1430 9.0 Introduction to International Development Studies

This course introduces students to the field of Development Studies, which has emerged as a result of efforts to bring about "development" in Third World countries. It uses a critical and historical approach, drawing on concrete case studies, to examine the assumptions, practices, and consequences of development. It also examines various approaches to development and explores both their theoretical and cultural assumptions, and their concrete application in diverse historical and social contexts.

These approaches are discussed in light of recent developments in the social sciences and changes in the global order, such as the feminist and the environmentalist critique of development models, the end of the cold war, the emergence of newly industrializing countries (NICs), globalization, and the weakening of nation-states. This course introduces students to the field of Development Studies, which has emerged as a result of efforts to bring about "development" in Third World countries. It uses a critical and historical approach, drawing on concrete case studies, to examine the assumptions, practices, and consequences of development.

It also examines various approaches to development and explores both their theoretical and cultural assumptions, and their concrete application in diverse historical and social contexts. These approaches are discussed in light of recent developments in the social sciences and changes in the global order, such as the feminist and the environmentalist critique of development models, the end of the cold war, the emergence of newly industrializing countries (NICs), globalization, and the weakening of nation states.