Course Descriptions

Anthropology

AP/ANTH 2100 3.00 Power, Politics & Development: Anthropological Approaches
This course analyzes and critiques the social and cultural foundations of historical and contemporary forms of capitalism, development and globalization. As part of this critique we examine forms of on-the-ground resistance around the world. Course credit exclusions: None. PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/ANTH 2100 6.00.

AP/ANTH 2100 6.0 One World, Many Peoples
The formation and consequences of an increasingly interdependent world amidst widespread diversity of society and culture is the theme of this course. We begin with an historical overview of the creation of this interdependence, looking at European colonial expansion from the voyages of Christopher Columbus to the Industrial Revolution. We then go on to examine more closely the processes of 19th and 20th century colonialism that insured the expansion of a capitalist market and that fueled the forces of globalization in our contemporary world.

Once we have gained some theoretical and historical insight into the creation of global economic, political, and cultural interdependence, we will focus on contemporary issues raised by the conditions of this interdependency. In this context we will look at such things as development policies and their consequences at the local level, cultural forms of resistance to internal colonialism, the consequences of globalization for marginalized populations, and the politics of resistance to contemporary global forces.

Projected Enrolment: 150
Course Director: T. Holmes

AP/ANTH 3240 6.00 Sexing the Subject: Sexuality from a Cross-Cultural Perspective
This course examines sexuality from a cross-cultural perspective in order to better understand how sexual practices, moralities and identities are constructed, contested and transformed in relation to cultural, political and economic forces.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/ANTH 3000M 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004) and AS/ANTH 3240 6.00.

Economics

AP/ECON 3199 3.0 Approaches to Global Economics
Explores approaches to the global economy, emphasizing structural and policy-related aspects.

Course credit exclusions: AP/ECON 3190 3.00, AP/POLS 3270 3.00, AP/POLS 3275 3.00, AP/POLS 3700 6.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/POLS 3700 6.00, AS/ECON 3190 3.00, AS/ECON 3199 3.00, AS/POLS 3270 3.00, AS/POLS 3275 3.00.

Course Director: TBA

AP/ECON 3550 3.0 Economic Growth & Development
Studies the economic problems of poor countries and poor communities. Explores the meaning of development by considering the characteristics of economic underdevelopment, poverty, income and wealth distribution, rural versus urban development, population growth, and unemployment and migration. Additional topics include theories of development, growth and technological change, strategies for environmentally sustainable development, education, and health.

Prerequisite: AP/ECON 1000 3.00 and AP/ECON 1010 3.00 or equivalents.
Course Credit Exclusion: GL/ECON/ILST 3920 3.00, AP/ECON 3559 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/ECON 3550 3.00, AS/ECON 3310 3.00.
Course Director: R. Grinspun & A. Kimakova

AP/ECON 3560 3.0 (AP/PPAS 3560) Economic Policy in Developing Countries
FORMERLY AP/ECON 3320 3.0M Development Economics II

Examines policy issues arising from development planning. Topics include agriculture versus industry, international trade, monetary and fiscal policies, foreign investment, foreign aid and self-reliance, and global issues.

Prerequisite: AP/ECON 1000 3.00 and AP/ECON 1010 3.00 or equivalents.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/ECON 3560 3.00, AP/PPAS 3560 3.00.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/ECON 3560 3.00, AP/ECON 3320 3.00, AK/PPAS 3560 3.00.
Course Director: R. Grinspun & A. Kimakova

AP/ECON 4129 3.0 International Trade Policy and Economic Integration
Deals with current policy issues in international trade and economic integration, focusing on specific institutional settings such as NAFTA, the European Union, the World Trade Organization, new policy areas such as trade and the environment, trade, and labour rights.

Prerequisite: AP/ECON 3150 3.00 or equivalent.
Course credit exclusions: None.
PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/ECON 4129 3.00.
Course Director: R. Grinspun

English

AP/EN3031 6.0 Diaspora Theory
This course explores theories of Diaspora, exile, transnationalism, dispossession, and borderlands as lenses for thinking through contemporary literary and cultural movements. This course full integrates academic writing and critical thinking as means of learning complex literary and cultural theories, as well as literary form and content; it attends to the aesthetics as well as the politics of diasporic and transnational writing. Students are expected to produce scholarly research papers that demonstrate substantial engagement with the theoretical material.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 3442 6.00, AS/EN 4233 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2005-2006).

AP/EN3240 6.0 Racial Minority Writing In Canada
An examination of the meaning of post-coloniality in the Canadian context by focusing on the work of writers of Native, Caribbean and South Asian backgrounds. It would be fruitful to study them together as their work provides a foreground to the experience of colonialism.

Course credit exclusions: None

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 3440 6.00

AP/EN 3410 3.0 Caribbean Literature
Examines Caribbean literature in English. The course explores how colonialism, post-colonialism and the lived experiences of the Caribbean people have shaped the novel, short story, poetry and drama.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AK/EN 3110C 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), AK/EN 3862 3.00, AS/EN 2370 6.00.

AP/EN 4000 6.0 Studies in Literature Theory:Cultural Studies
This course explores theoretical and practical approaches to reading tests, images and representations of popular culture/media studies. Please consult the departmental supplemental calendar for a detailed course description.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 4100E 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/EN 4103 3.00.

AP/EN 4410 3.0 Caribbean Performance and Memory
This course draws on insights from performance studies and theories of social memory to examine Caribbean literary and cultural performances in the post-independence era. Reading and viewing a diverse selection of poetry, drama, fiction, carnival, dance, and film from different countries, we will discuss each performance's contribution to social memory and constructions of community. Each literary or cultural performance will be analyzed against historical circumstances, postcolonial critical interventions, and the rise of metropolitan multiculturalism. Classes will take the form of seminar discussions, screenings, and student presentations.

Reserved Spaces: Fourth year LACS students
Course Credit Exclusion(s): AS/EN 4234 6.0

AP/EN 4411 3.00 Derek Walcott
The course considers Derek Walcott's development as a poet and dramatist. It analyses Walcott's main themes, forms and techniques, and attempts to assess his success in incorporating diverse cultural and technical influences into a distinctive West Indian style.

Course credit exclusions: AP/EN 4230D 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/EN 4231 3.00

French

AP/FR 4361 3.00 Francophone Literature I:Towards Independence
Through a study of works in their historical, social and aesthetic context, this course explores literary genres and philosophical perspectives as expressions of the spirit of 20th-century anti-colonial movements in the Francophone world.

Prerequisite: AP/FR 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusions: GL/FRAN 3923 3.00, GL/HUMA 3923 3.00.

Prior to fall 2009: Prerequisite: AS/FR 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusions: AS/FR 4361 3.00, GL/FRAN 3923 3.00, GL/HUMA 3923 3.00.

AP/FR 4363 3.00 Francophone Literature II
Through a study of works in their historical, social and aesthetic context, this course explores literature in the post-colonial Francophone world. It highlights the uses of literary genres and the creation of new forms to express the struggle for unity and social renewal.

Prerequisite: AP/FR 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusions: GL/FRAN 3923 3.00, GL/HUMA 3923 3.00.

Prior to fall 2009:
Prerequisite: AS/FR 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusions:AS/FR 4363 3.00, GL/FRAN 3923 3.00, GL/HUMA 3923 3.00.

Geography

AP/GEOG 2020 6.0 Geographical Transformation of the Caribbean Islands
This course analyzes the geographic status of the Caribbean islands. It examines how interactions between natural-environmental factors and human activities since the beginnings of settlement account for the current appearance, character, problems and prospects for individual islands and for the region.

Course credit exclusion: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 2020 6.00.

AP/GEOG 4020 3.0 The Caribbean Islands since 1492
The course examines the extent to which the geographic features (both human and physical) of the Caribbean Islands have changed since prehistoric times, and presents a number of possible explanations for such change - including changing relationships between human activity and the "natural" world. Following a brief but intensive review of our understanding of empirical change in the region, the course focuses on the methods used to gather and assess evidence; and critically analyzes the relevance of alternative theories of change.

Pre-requisites: 54 credits successfully completed, including GEOG. 1400; and GEOG. 1000 or GEOG. 1410. GEOG. 2020 is recommended
Course Director: B. Found

History

AP/HIST 2720 6.0 A History of Latin America
This course introduces the history of Latin America from the beginning of European colonization through the present with an emphasis on gender history and cultural history. Among the topics likely to be considered in depth are the long-term consequences of the European conquest, the enslavement of Africans and the abolition of slavery, the development of nation-states, twentieth century revolutionary movements, the Cold War, and social and political movements.

Course credit exclusions: AP/HIST 2720 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012), GL/HIST 2200 6.00.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 3720 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), GL/HIST 2200 6.00.

AP/HIST 2730 6.0 A History of the Caribbean: from Colinization to Independence
This course examines the historical development of the Caribbean from its aboriginal occupation to 20th century socio-political developments. It explores similarities and differences in social and political structures and cultural characteristics of various parts of the region.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 2730 6.00.

AP/HIST: 3700 6.00 African, Caribbean and Latin American Connections: The Making of the South Atlantic World
Relations between Europe and the non-European world from the 16th century to 1914 are studied comparatively, with emphasis on the nature of European empires, the impact of colonial rule, and the varied responses of non-European societies to European expansion.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 2700 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2000-2001), AS/HIST 3700 6.00.

AP/HIST: 3710 6.00 Aftermath of Slavery in the Caribbean
The economic, social and cultural roots of political change in the Caribbean from the Haitian revolution of 1791 to the Cuban revolution of 1959. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development of ideologies in Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica and Trinidad.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3710 6

AP/HIST 3730 6.0 Mexican History fromt he Aztecs to the Mexican Revolution(1325-1911)
Mexican history from the rise of the Aztec Empire to the Mexican Revolution (1911-1917). The course deals with the processes of imperial expansion and collapse in the indigenous, Spanish and Mexican eras, within a context of increasing globalization.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 3730 6.00, AS/HIST 3730 3.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2004-2005)
Projected Enrolment: 50 Course Director: T.B.A

AP/HIST 3731 6.00 A 20th Century Mexico
This course considers the 1911 Mexican Revolution and its consequences, especially processes of migration, urbanization and cultural change.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3731 6.00.

AP/HIST 3732 3.00 Contemporary Mexican History, 1940-2000
This course examines the post-Revolutionary period in Mexico. Through a study of a period of single-party rule, this course emphasizes rapid demographic, economic, social and cultural change in a time of apparent political stasis.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3732 3.00.

AP/HIST 3733 3.00 The Spanish Conquest of Mexico
This course examines the Spanish conquest of Mexico using translated historical documents, and analyzes changing understandings of what was involved in the European invasion of the Americas.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3733 3.00.

AP/HIST 3734 3.00 Conflict Resistance and Revolution in Latin American HIstory
This course invites students to analyze and compare political, cultural, and economic conflicts as a means of understanding long-term tensions in Latin American societies concerning issues such as race, caste, class, citizenship and national identity.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HIST 3734 6.00.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 3734 6.00, AS/HIST 3734 3.00.

AP/HIST 3735 3.00 Latin American Environmental History of the Colonial Era
This course introduces the environmental-history approach to the study of Latin American colonial history. It examines reciprocal interactions between natural and social processes from 1492 to 1850.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 3735 3.00.

AP/HIST 3736 6.0 Colonialism and Nation Building in the Andes
This course examines the history of the Andean region of South America; especially Peru, from the conquest of the Inca empire by the Spanish up to the present day. Special attention is given to the situation of the indigenous population and its changing role in processes of empire and nation building that were dominated by white elites.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 3736 6.0
Course Director: A. Durston

AP/HIST 4725 6.0A Topics in Modern Caribbean Histroy
This course examines topics in the development of the Caribbean, 1938-1983, from the labour riots of the thirties to the American intervention in Grenada. It includes a Pan-Caribbean examination of economic, political and socio-cultural developments in this period. Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4725 6.0
Course Director: D. Trotman

AP/HIST 4750 6.00 BACKWARDNESS AND REVOLUTION IN LATIN AMERICA
This course examines underdevelopment and revolution in Latin America with emphasis on specific revolutions, such as those of Cuba and Chile, and selected topics related to underdevelopment, such as the role of multinational corporations and the problems of marginalism.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AK/HIST 4109A 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2001-2002), AS/HIST 4750 6.00

AP/HIST 4752 6.0A Gender, Sex & Family in Latin American History
This course examines the intersections between daily interactions (especially those involving kinship, race, ethnicity, and class) and politics on the national and imperial scale. It covers the period 1350-2000 in the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking regions of the Americas.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2720 6.00 or AP/HIST 2730 6.00 or AP/HIST 3710 6.00 or AP/HIST 3730 6.00 or AP/HIST 3731 6.00 or AP/HIST 3732 3.00 or AP/HIST 3733 3.00 or AP/HIST 3734 3.00/6.00 or AP/HIST 3735 3.00 or AP/HIST 3736 6.00 or AP/HUMA 2310 9.00 or AP/SOSC 2460 9.00 or departmental permission.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4752 6.00.

AP/HIST 4753 6.00 CHRISTIANITIES AND INDIGENOUS CIVILIZATIONS IN COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
This seminar explores the establishment of Christianity among the indigenous peoples of colonial Latin America, with a primary focus on Mexico and Peru.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HIST 4753 6.00.

AP/HIST 4755 6.00 CULTURAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA
Comparative analysis of the cultures and societies of Colonial Latin America; discussion of the historical process of reinventing, reinterpreting and negotiating the colonial reality.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4755 6.00.

AP/HIST 4830 6.00 In Slavery and Freedom: Blacks in the Americas
This course examines and compares the responses of Africans and their descendants to the experiences of enslavement, racism, colonialism and imperialism from the 15th century to the 20th century and analyses the impact of the African presence on western 'civilization'.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HIST 4830 6.00.

Humanities

AP/HUMA 2310 9.0 An Introduction to Caribbean Studies
This course introduces students to the major cultural characteristics of the contemporary Caribbean through an examination of the writers, artists and scholars of the region. Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to Fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 2310 9.00.

AP/HUMA 3305 3.0 The Calypso as Caribbean Oral Literature
This course examines developments in the calypso circa 1922-1992, including changes in its form, function and content. The course also explores the calypso for commentaries on nationhood, community relations in a multi-ethnic society and issues of sexuality and gender relations.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HUMA 3310 3.00 The Writer and Folk Culuture in the Caribbean
This course examines aesthetic and expressive aspects of Caribbean folk culture and explores how and why West Indian novelists, dramatists and poets have used this culture in their literary works.

Course credit exclusion: AP/HUMA 3310 6.00.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/HUMA 3310 3.00, AS/HUMA 3310 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3315 3.00 Black Literatures and Cultures in Canada
This course challenges the positioning of the African American experience as a dominant referent for black cultures in the Americas through an examination of fictional writing produced by blacks in Canada and the notion of a transatlantic African diasporic sensibility.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3315 3.00.

AP/HUMA 3316 3.00 Black Womoen's Writing Diaspora and Gender in the Caribbean, Canada and the United States
This course introduces students to literature produced by black women writers in the Caribbean, Canada and the United States after the 1970s.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3316 3.00.

AP/HUMA 3320 3.0 Caribbean Thought: A Post-Colonial Perspective
(cross-listed to: AP/REI 3320 6.00)

By focusing on influential post-colonial theorists, this course examines 20th century attempts to rethink the Western humanistic tradition from the point of view of colonized and formerly colonized peoples.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 3320 6.00.

AP/HUMA 3664 3.00 Caribbean Traditional Culture
This course introduces students to traditional oral cultures of the African-Caribbean diaspora. Adapting an ethnographic approach, the course focuses on the culture's African origins, its evolution in the Caribbean nations, and its subsequent transplantation to urban contexts such as Toronto.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/HUMA 4300 6.00 Aspects of Modern Latin American and Caribbean Studies
(cross-listed to: AP/SOSC 4450 6.00)

This seminar is designed to integrate the Honours Program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the upper level.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 4300 6.00.

AP/HUMA 4315 6.00 Religion and Politics in Latin America and the Caribbean
Drawing from a variety of disciplinary areas (particularly theology, cultural studies and history, but also anthropology, sociology and political science) this course examines how the Caribbean experience is interpreted in religious discourse and influenced by religious thought and practice.

Course Credit Exclusion: AP/HUMA 4310A 6.00

Jamaican Creole

AP/JC 1000 6.00 Introduction to Jamaican Creaole
This course serves as an introduction to Jamaican Creole and is meant for students with no background in the language. It will develop basic oral, conversational, reading, and writing skills in the language.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/JC 1000 6.00.

AP/JC 2000 6.00 Intermediate Jamaican Creole
This course is specifically designed for individuals who have some knowledge of Jamaican Creole. It seeks to develop further students' proficiency in the language as well as to provide students with a deeper understanding of how the language works.

Prerequisite: AP/JC 1000 6.00 (Introduction to Jamaican Creole) or some knowledge of Jamaican Creole.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/JC 1000 6.00 (Introduction to Jamaican Creole) or some knowledge of Jamaican Creole. Course credit exclusion: AS/JC 2000 6.00.

Multicultural and Indigenous Studies (MIST)

AP/REI 3475 3.00 English-Speaking Caribbean:Development and Underdevelopment
Examines the nature of politics in the region as a whole and in specific countries. Focuses upon the region's historical economic dependence upon metropolitan countries and the emergence of new political forces and institutions in response to changes in its socio-economic structure.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Course credit exclusions: AK/SOCI 2580 6.00

AP/REI 3620 6.00 Racism and Colonialism
Colonialism and racial conflict examined in historical and comparative perspective, including a discussion of links between racism and sexism. Examples are drawn from some of these areas: Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, the Middle East.

Course credit exclusion: AP/SOCI 3620 6.00 (prior to fall 2012).

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AK/SOCI 2580 6.00 (prior to summer 1998), AK/SOCI 3620 6.00.

Political Science

AP/POLS 3550 3.00 Revolution and Counter Revolution in Central America
This course examines post-Second World War Central American politics in light of theories of revolution, including national and international political and social forces that explain the emergence and success or failure of revolutionary movements and counter-revolutionary offensives in the region.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/POLS 3555 3.00 Dictatorship and Democratization in South America
This course examines post-Second World War experiences of dictatorship and democratization in South America. Regional trends and specific countries (such as Brazil, Chile and Peru) are considered from a political economy perspective, including class relations, popular organizations and political institutions.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/POLS 3560 6.00 The Global South
This course explores various dimensions of the global south, with emphasis on political-economy and development. It examines the similarities and differences between various local experiences in the global south and explores their contemporary dynamic in a historical context.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/POLS 3560 6.00.

AP/POLS 4225 3.00 Canada and the Americas
This course introduces students to the principal themes and debates surrounding the apparent revival of several major Latin American countries. Topics include the present Latin American economic environment; the socio-political and "good government" backdrop to economic revival; the process and politics of trade liberalization in the Western Hemisphere; and Canada's emergence as a full actor in the Americas.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Portugese

AP/POR 3650 3.00 Aspects of Modern Brazil
This course presents a picture of modern Brazil through the literary works of major writers, such as Aluisio Azevedo and Jorge Amado, as well as films and non-literary writings.

Prerequisite: AP/POR 2000 6.00 for Portuguese Studies majors and minors.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/POR 3650 3.00.

AP/POR 4630 3.00 The Works of Jorge Amado
This course explores the literary works of Jorge Amado, one of Brazil's leading 20thcentury authors. Several films and television series based on his works are also considered in comparison to his written works.

Prerequisite: AP/POR 3000 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/POR 3000 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/POR 4630 3.00.

Social Science

AP/SOSC 2460 9.0 Contemporary Latin America
This course introduces students to the basic features of contemporary Latin America through an examination of the social, political and economic changes that occurred in the region over the past century. Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/SOSC 2460 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/SOSC 2460 9.00.

AP/SOSC 2470 6.00 Caribbean Society in Transition: Emancipation to Independence
This course explores the sociocultural matrix of Commonwealth Caribbean society, and examines the quest for identity, personal and national, and the pattern of institutional development in promoting or frustrating that quest, including insularity and regionalism; race, colour and class; political leadership.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/SOSC 3270 6.00 The Caribbean Experience in Multi Cultural - Canada
The course starts from the assumption that multiculturalism is an objective of Canadian society today and into the future. It will argue that the Caribbean presence is part of that ideal. The course will examine the socio-historical evidence for this assumption, analyze its ideological bases and potential.

Then it will explore the range of implications for personal and social structural adjustments in Canadian society. The principal focus will be citizens of Caribbean cultural heritage.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/SOSC 3410 6.00 Political Economy of Latin America
(cross-listed to: AP/POLS 3553 6.00)

This course examines the history and political economy of the Americas using case studies from Latin America and the Caribbean to highlight the forces that have shaped the internal politics of the region and its relationship to world markets.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/POLS 3790 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004), AS/SOSC 3410 6.00.

AP/SOSC 3411 6.00 Third World Feminism and the Politics of Development
This course examines women's responses and resistances to dominant trends in development theory and practice through a study of 'Third World' feminist critiques and alternative theories and models for development.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 3411 6.00.

AP/SOSC 3730 6.00 Comparative Urban Development
Significant dimensions of urbanization and urban-rural relationships are examined comparatively across major world regions, with emphasis upon Africa, Asia and Latin America. Students may choose a regional focus for research papers, including North America. Migration patterns, socio-economic structure of cities, values and images of rural and urban life, employment and planning to meet the needs of growing cities are the principal topics covered.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/SOSC 4450 3.00 Aspects of Modern Latin American & Caribbean Studies: Culture and Politics
This course draws on oral history, novels, and some of the most accessible and entertaining social scientific studies to explore some of the central themes of both Latin American and Caribbean history and contemporary life, including revolution, resistance and repression, rural life, politics of race relations, and national and international migration.

Course credit exclusion: AP/SOSC 4300 6.00.

AP/SOSC 4451 6.00 Caribbean Feminisms
An in-depth exploration of the emergence and specificity of feminist thought and action in Caribbean history and contemporary theory.

Prerequisite: AP/GL/WMST 2500 6.00 or AP/GL/WMST 2510 9.00 or AP/HUMA 2310 9.00 or AP/SOSC 2470 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AK/AS/GL/WMST 2500 6.00 or AK/AS/GL/WMST 2510 9.00 or AS/HUMA 2310 9.00 or AS/SOSC 2470 6.00.

Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 4451 6.00.

AP/SOSC 4452 3.00 State amd Civil Society in Latin America: Social Movements & Community Development in the 21st Century
This course examines the emerging relationship between civil society and the state, as well as the changing roles of community organizations, social movements and NGOs in the development of Latin America.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusion: AS/SOSC 4452 3.00.

Sociology

AP/SOCI 4050 6.00 African Communities in the Americas
An analysis of enslavement and of family structure and gender, politics, and paths of cultural resistance in selected African communities in the Americas, together with an examination of theoretical perspectives on black struggle.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AK/SOCI 4050 6.00, AK/HIST 4910 6.00.

AP/SOCI 4230 6.0 Sociology of Cultures and Ethnic Identities
This course examines the process by which immigrant groups become detached from their homelands and integrate into Canadian society. Topics include social change in the homeland and social incorporation in Canada.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Course credit exclusions: AS/SOCI 4230 6.00, AS/SOCI 4230A 6.00 (prior to Fall/Winter 2003-2004).

AP/SOCI 4350 3.00 International Migration
This course examines emerging patterns of international migration and refugee flows. Particular attention is given to the recent rise of emigration from Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America to North America. These flows are studied from the perspective of global trends in political economy, development and underdevelopment, and social-cultural ties and networks.

Course credit exclusions: None.

AP/SOCI 4390 3.00 International Migration: Immigration the State and Transnationalism
This course introduces theoretical perspectives on transnational migration, focusing on immigrant incorporation, citizenship, the host state, relations with the home state/community and transnationalism. Comparative material from various regions may be used.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/SOCI 4390 3.00.

Spanish

AP/SP 3210 6.00 Aspects of Spanish-American Literature
An intensive study of prose and poetry from colonial times to the 20th century, with some reference to historical and social influences on the development of literature.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 2200 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009: Prerequisite: AS/SP 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 3210 6.00.

AP/SP 3580 6.00 The Generation of 1898 and Modern Spain
A study of major Spanish writers and thinkers from the generation of 1898 up to the present and their response to the problems facing the Spanish nation. Among the authors to be studied are Unamuno, Machado, Baraja, Zorin, Lorca, J. Ortega y Gasset and contemporary women writers.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 2200 6.00.

Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/SP 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 3580 6.00.

AP/SP 4120 3.00 History of the Spanish Language
This course explores the history of the Spanish language from its Latin origins. We focus on phonological and grammatical developments, the socio-historical factors that contribute to these changes, and analyze texts in which they are evident.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 3000 6.00, AP/SP 3050 6.00 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/SP 3000 6.00, AS/SP 3050 6.00 or equivalent or permission of instructor.
Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 4120 3.00.

AP/SP 4130 3.00 Varieties of Spanish Worldwide
This course explores regional varieties of Spanish from the Iberian Peninsula and Latin American, including indigenous and African contributions to Latin America Spanish, and contact varieties in the United States and elsewhere.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 3000 6.00, AP/SP 3050 6.00 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/SP 3000 6.00, AS/SP 3050 6.00 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 4130 3.00.

AP/SP 4580 3.00 Spanish-American Modernismo
A survey of the poetry of the major Spanish-American modernists Jose Marti, Ruben Dario, Julian del Casal and Manuel Gutierrez Najera. In addition, the course considers the social and literary milieu of the period.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 2200 6.00.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/SP 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 4580 3.00.

AP/SP 4640 6.00 The Spanish-American Novel of the 20th Century
A close study of the novel in 20th-century Spanish America, based on works of some of the major novelists.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 2200 6.00.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/SP 2200 6.00. Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 4640 6.00.

AP/SP 4650 6.00 Literature and Music in Spanish America
This course studies significant movements and interactions between literature and music as authentic expressions of cultural identity in Spanish America, by examining the textual and performative contexts in which musical forms are adopted in literature and literature is set to music.

Prerequisite: AP/SP 2200 6.00 or permission of the Department.
Course credit exclusions: None.

Prior to fall 2009:

Prerequisite: AS/SP 2200 6.00 or permission of the Department.
Course credit exclusion: AS/SP 4650 6.00.